Tag Archives: SBC

Why Use Inforce SBC

Why Use Inforce SBC(Single Board Computer)?

The Single Board Computer(SBC) is a ready to use reference embedded platform that has all the necessary peripheral interfaces required to rapidly prototype your product. This usually comes in standard Pico ITX or Credit Card Size form factors. Inforce currently has the IFC6640, IFC6560 and the IFC6309 which uses the Snapdragon 820, Snapdragon 660 and the Snapdragon 410 respectively. SBC’s usually exposes all interfaces available to the SOC like GPIO’s/BLSP’s, USB, GPS. WiFi/BT, RJ45(Ethernet), Audio in/out, HDMI, MiPi DSI and CSI.
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Checkout Inforce’s Snapdragon-based Products at CES 2016: Go to the Qualcomm Booths!

Hope all of you have had a great start to 2016 after a much needed Christmas and New Year’s break. If you will be at CES 2016 this week (January 6-9) in Las Vegas, please do stop by the following Qualcomm® booths to take a look at Inforce Computing’s exciting Snapdragon™ processor-based compute platforms in the form of SBCs, SoMs, and development kits.

1. Qualcomm Main Booth: Central Hall, #8952–What to see:

  • IoT Wall:
    • An Enterprise Videoconferencing Endpoint solution powered by a custom Inforce 64XX SBC (Snapdragon 600 processor)
    • A connected point-of-care (battery operated/portable) Ultrasound Imaging System powered by an Inforce 64XX SoM (Snapdragon 600)
  • Smart Cities Area:
    • Inforce 6309 Micro SBC (Snapdragon 410) for industrial IoE applications at the edge-of-the-network
    • Inforce 6401 Micro SoM (Snapdragon 600) for SWaP constrained designs requiring low power and full-HD video processing
    • Inforce 6540 SBC and Inforce 6501 Micro SoM (Snapdragon 805) for 4K Ultra HD video capture/playback and high-end processing

2. Qualcomm Unmanned Systems Booth: South Hall, #25824–what to see:

  • Inforce Robotics Development Kit running ROS on Linaro Linux: Inforce 6410Plus SBC (Snapdragon 600) and a Peripheral Abstraction Core (PAC) Mezzanine card with an ARM® Cortex®-M4; Grove connectors and Arduino compatibility for connecting multiple external sensors, SBUS for motor control, 10 DoF on-board sensors, and more.

Best wishes for a wonderful year ahead! Don’t hesitate to contact us if you need further information.

Cheers,
Vasu Madabushi
Inforce Computing

Introducing the New and Enhanced Inforce 6410Plus SBC based on the Qualcomm Snapdragon 600

Inforce 6410 Plus Single Board Computer (SBC)We are delighted to announce the availability of the Qualcomm® Snapdragon™ 600 (APQ8064 SoC) powered brand newInforce 6410Plus™ Single-board-computer (SBC). With the introduction of the product/application-ready Inforce 6410Plus, what’s been a such a workhorse for several hundreds of projects over the past two years, just got even better. The popular Inforce 6410 SBC received a major upgrade with several new added features. Continued excellent software support (Linaro Ubuntu Linux and Android BSPs, peripheral device drivers, Robot Operating System [ROS]) makes it easy plug-and-play. And the cherry on the cake is that you can purchase the Inforce 6410Plus for the same price of $143 (board only) as before.

 

Vasu Madabushi
The Inforce Computing Team

© 2015 Inforce Computing, Inc. All rights reserved.

Heading to the DARPA Robotics Challenge this week? Check out OSRF’s Turtlebot powered by the Inforce 6410 SBC!

Several robots will face off at the upcoming DARPA Robotics Challenge (DRC) finals in Pomona, Calif., June 5-6, 2015. So, what’s at stake, you might ask. How about a cool $3.5 Mil. in prizes? The winner grabs a sweet $2MM, the runner-up $1MM, and the third place gets $500K–that’s no chump change! This challenge involves navigating a difficult simulated disaster-response course and 24 of the world’s top robotics teams are competing. The course will obviously not be easy–with degraded communication hampering the robot operators, arduous and successive physical tasks include driving a utility vehicle, stepping out and opening doors, locating and closing valves, cutting through walls, clearing debris, and walking up stairs. Here’s a cool video from the WPI-CMU team! As you can see, the DRC is setup to test mobility, dexterity, manipulation, perception, and decision making skills these robots need to excel at to navigate hazardous conditions in disaster affected areas.

Along the sidelines of the DRC challenge, you will also get to see over 80 companies display their robots and UAVs at DARPAthe Technology Exposition. The Open Source Robotics Foundation (OSRF) will demo their Turtlebot exhibit among other things–please do stop by their booth #14. What’s unique about the Turtlebot demo? It runs the Robot Operating System (ROS) and is powered by the Inforce 6410 single board computer (SBC). Recall that Qualcomm ported ROS to the Snapdragon 600 powered Inforce 6410 last year. Get your hand at driving these Turtlebots around and share your experience!

Talking about the Inforce 6410, ARM recently did a nice review of the SBC and the response to what can be done with the board was fantastic. Sorry, a winner has already been announced. If you are serious about building robots and drones that solve real-life human problems, look no further than starting with the compute building blocks Inforce provides in the form of SOMs and SBCs. Check out the ubiquitous Inforce 6501 Micro SOM that measures just 28mm x 50mm and weighs under 8 grams (0.3oz). With a profile of just 6mm and powered by the Snapdragon™ 805 processor, a custom carrier board with the right kind of I/Os can be built to fit into some of these SWaP constrained designs. You can jump-start your robot designs with Qualcomm’s FastCV™, Vuforia™, Alljoyn™, Hexagon™, and other SDKs that enable computer vision, machine learning, pattern recognition, and communication capabilities on Inforce’s compute platforms.

Vasu Madabushi
The Inforce Computing Team

© 2015 Inforce Computing, Inc. All rights reserved.

Freedreno Linux Graphics Drivers and Embedded Android for Snapdragon™ Based Inforce Computing Products at the ELC this Week

Want to find out more about the free-and-open-source-software (FOSS) Freedreno Linux graphics drivers or embedded Android for Snapdragon basedInforce 6410 and Inforce 6540 SBCs? If youEmbedded Linux Conference Logoplan to be at the Linux Foundation’s Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) and the co-located Android Builders Summit, March 23-25 in San Jose, CA this week, check out these really interesting presentations/ tutorials where Inforce Computing’s products (such as the Inforce 6410 and Inforce 6540 SBCs) will be shown in demos. The ELC is being held at the Marriott in downtown San Jose, CA.

Karim Yaghmour’s presentations:

What When Where
Memory Management Internals Monday, March 23, 2015, 5:20PM-6:10PM San Jose Marriott
Embedded Android one-day workshop Wednesday, March 25, 2015, 9:00AM-3:30PM San Jose Marriott

Rob Clark (the main guy behind the FOSS Freedreno Linux graphics drivers for the Adreno 3XX and 4XX series of GPUs in the Snapdragon family of processors) will talk about the progress he and other fellow contributors have made to an upstream gallium and kernel drm/kms driver. This has resulted in software that now also works on Inforce’s Snapdragon based products (composited DE’s like gnome-shell, Wayland, games, WebGL, etc., which one has come to take for granted on x86 based desktops!) If you need to get a sneak preview of his talk, check out what was shown at the recent Linaro Connect in Hong Kong:

Also, stop by the Technical Showcase at the ELC (see details below) to see the Freedreno demos running on the Inforce 6410 and Inforce 6540 SBCs. I’ll be there supporting Rob and would be glad to answer any questions you may have about Inforce’s products.

Rob Clark’s presentation and the Technical Showcase:

What When Where
Freedreno Status Report: Upstream and FOSS Graphics on ARM/SoC Devices Tuesday, March 24,
4:25pm-5:15pm
San Jose Marriott
Embedded Linux Technical Showcase Tuesday, March 24, at 6:20 pm San Jose Marriott

Vasu Madabushi
Inforce Computing Team

© 2015 Inforce Computing, Inc. All rights reserved.

Google Chrome OS Team to Add Support for Inforce 6410 SBC Powered by Qualcomm Snapdragon 600

The Google open-source Chrome OS team tells us that it has started working on support for theInforce® 6410 single board computer (SBC), which is based on the Qualcomm® Snapdragon™ 600 processor. In a Google+ post just a few days ago, this was shared by François Beaufort, Google’s open-source evangelist in the Chrome OS team.

Inforce 6410 SBC based on the Snapdragon 600 processorRob Clark, the main force behind the open-source freedreno graphics drivers for the Adreno 3XX and 4XX GPUs in Qualcomm Snapdragon SoCs, commented on the same post that this was a community effort along with Sean Paul of the Chrome OS team. With an upstream kernel running on the Inforce 6410 SBC, and an open source Gallium3D driver available, it was natural to work towards a Snapdragon based (ARMv7 compliant) free-and-open-source-software (FOSS) Chromium OS build. The Inforce 6410 SBC was thus an easy choice to port Chrome OS to the Snapdragon 600 processor (APQ8064 SoC). So stay tuned for further progress on this effort and the availability of Chrome OS builds for the Inforce 6410 SBC.

Coming close on the heels of Robot Operating System (ROS) support for Inforce 6410 SBC and the availability of board support packages (BSP) for Linaro (Ubuntu Linux 14.10) and Android (KitKat 4.4), the versatile Inforce 6410 platform provides multiple OS support for jumpstarting embedded designs. The icing on the cake is the availability for freedreno graphics drivers for Fedora, Linaro, and now Chrome OS (under development), making the Inforce 6410 SBC a popular choice for a variety of embedded applications.