Monthly Archives: June 2015

Full-featured Android Lollipop (5.0.2) BSP Now Available

Software Update for the Inforce 6540™ Single Board Computer  and the Inforce 6501™ Micro SOM (powered by the Qualcomm® Snapdragon™ 805/APQ8084 processor)

Inforce_6540_angle_labelAndroid LollipopIFC6501-P2_Profile

A full-featured Android Board Support Package (BSP) running Lollipop 5.0.2 on the Inforce 6540 SBC and the Inforce 6501 Micro SOM is available for download from Inforce Computing’s TechWeb for registered users. This is a significant enhancement in software support for Qualcomm Snapdragon processor-based embedded designs from Inforce Computing.

Software Platform Version
The following software platforms are supported in this release:

  • Linux Kernel – Version 3.10.40
  • Android Lollipop – Version 5.0.2

Vasu Madabushi
The Inforce Computing Team

© 2015 Inforce Computing, Inc. All rights reserved.

Introducing the New and Enhanced Inforce 6410Plus SBC based on the Qualcomm Snapdragon 600

Inforce 6410 Plus Single Board Computer (SBC)We are delighted to announce the availability of the Qualcomm® Snapdragon™ 600 (APQ8064 SoC) powered brand newInforce 6410Plus™ Single-board-computer (SBC). With the introduction of the product/application-ready Inforce 6410Plus, what’s been a such a workhorse for several hundreds of projects over the past two years, just got even better. The popular Inforce 6410 SBC received a major upgrade with several new added features. Continued excellent software support (Linaro Ubuntu Linux and Android BSPs, peripheral device drivers, Robot Operating System [ROS]) makes it easy plug-and-play. And the cherry on the cake is that you can purchase the Inforce 6410Plus for the same price of $143 (board only) as before.

 

Vasu Madabushi
The Inforce Computing Team

© 2015 Inforce Computing, Inc. All rights reserved.

Heading to the DARPA Robotics Challenge this week? Check out OSRF’s Turtlebot powered by the Inforce 6410 SBC!

Several robots will face off at the upcoming DARPA Robotics Challenge (DRC) finals in Pomona, Calif., June 5-6, 2015. So, what’s at stake, you might ask. How about a cool $3.5 Mil. in prizes? The winner grabs a sweet $2MM, the runner-up $1MM, and the third place gets $500K–that’s no chump change! This challenge involves navigating a difficult simulated disaster-response course and 24 of the world’s top robotics teams are competing. The course will obviously not be easy–with degraded communication hampering the robot operators, arduous and successive physical tasks include driving a utility vehicle, stepping out and opening doors, locating and closing valves, cutting through walls, clearing debris, and walking up stairs. Here’s a cool video from the WPI-CMU team! As you can see, the DRC is setup to test mobility, dexterity, manipulation, perception, and decision making skills these robots need to excel at to navigate hazardous conditions in disaster affected areas.

Along the sidelines of the DRC challenge, you will also get to see over 80 companies display their robots and UAVs at DARPAthe Technology Exposition. The Open Source Robotics Foundation (OSRF) will demo their Turtlebot exhibit among other things–please do stop by their booth #14. What’s unique about the Turtlebot demo? It runs the Robot Operating System (ROS) and is powered by the Inforce 6410 single board computer (SBC). Recall that Qualcomm ported ROS to the Snapdragon 600 powered Inforce 6410 last year. Get your hand at driving these Turtlebots around and share your experience!

Talking about the Inforce 6410, ARM recently did a nice review of the SBC and the response to what can be done with the board was fantastic. Sorry, a winner has already been announced. If you are serious about building robots and drones that solve real-life human problems, look no further than starting with the compute building blocks Inforce provides in the form of SOMs and SBCs. Check out the ubiquitous Inforce 6501 Micro SOM that measures just 28mm x 50mm and weighs under 8 grams (0.3oz). With a profile of just 6mm and powered by the Snapdragon™ 805 processor, a custom carrier board with the right kind of I/Os can be built to fit into some of these SWaP constrained designs. You can jump-start your robot designs with Qualcomm’s FastCV™, Vuforia™, Alljoyn™, Hexagon™, and other SDKs that enable computer vision, machine learning, pattern recognition, and communication capabilities on Inforce’s compute platforms.

Vasu Madabushi
The Inforce Computing Team

© 2015 Inforce Computing, Inc. All rights reserved.